St. Lukacs Bath

St. Lukacs Bath
Outdoor pools of St. Lukacs Bath
Saunaworld
Saunaworld

Sections of the Lukacs Bath can be separated by their function (health, sport, wellness) and this is a pattern easily visible in the construction. The thermal section operates with three hot water pools (32 °C – 40 °C) and a smaller sauna. There is a steam bath here with a cold water diving pool. It is possible to swim in the two outdoor pools. The colder 22 °C pool is called the men’s and the 26 °C the women’s swimming pool, referring to the former separation of sexes in the spa. Earlier the men’s pool was available for women but using the women’s as a man was prohibited. In 2012 the so called “saunaworld” was built in place of the former small outdoor saunas and a fancy pool was built, equipped with a whirling corridor, underwater effervescence, neck shower, water beam back massage hidden in the seat banks, whirlpool, and geysers. 

St. Lukacs Bath postcard
The Bath on a postcard

The healing spring at the foot of the hill were already known and used by the Romans. During the conquest of the Carpathian Basin a town called Felheviz was here. In the 12th century, knights of the order of Saint John engaging in curing the sick settled in the area of today’s Lukacs Bath, followed by the orders of Rhodos and Malta, who built their monasteries baths as well. The bath operated through the time of the Turks but the energy of the springs were used primarily to produce gunpowder and for grinding wheat. After the reoccupation of Buda, the bath became the property of the Treasury. In 1884, Fülöp Palotay purchased the bath from the Treasury, thus a series of transformations began under the hands of Rezso Ray. The spa hotel was built, an up-to-date hydrotherapy department was established and the swimming pool was transformed, henceforth the bath is called St. Lukacs. People wishing to be healed came from all over the world. Following their successful healing cure, they placed marble tablets onto the wall of the Bath’s courtyard to express their gratitude

Gratitude tablets
Tablets of Thanks on the wall of St. Lukacs Bath

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